The village that survived a war

The village that survived a war

“This is the bridge where the war started,” said Mustafa as we crossed over the sparkling Miljacka River that divides the Bosnian city of Sarajevo.

I had walked over this bridge before, just to admire the view, but had not realised its significance: on the afternoon of 6 April 1992, this is where snipers mowed down two young women as they joined a peace march. Multi-ethnic strife disintegrated into full-blown war as Serbs laid siege to Sarajevo and began killing Muslims and Croats as they tried to carve out a Serb Republic. Continue reading The village that survived a war

Where a simple photo changed a life

Where a simple photo changed a life

A white-haired beggar sits outside the 13th-century Konark Sun Temple in Odisha, India, a wide smile spread across his face. His hands, deformed by leprosy, cradle the first photo of himself he has ever seen.                

Swapna, a young mother in Kolkata, lives in a grass hut without electricity or running water. She has no photos of her wedding, but thanks to Hollywood film editor Bipasha Shom, she owns a portrait of herself and her five-month-old son, Neeladri. Continue reading Where a simple photo changed a life

Best Destinations You Can Reach from Heathrow

Best Destinations You Can Reach from Heathrow

London Heathrow Airport is always a great hub from which you can start amazing trips. A lot of domestic and international flights start at Heathrow, and almost all airlines, including British Airways, have an office here as well. There are lots of great places to visit from this international hub and we are going to take a look at some of the best right here in this article.

Best Destinations You Can Reach from Heathrow

Dubai and Abu Dhabi

These are the two most well known cities in the United Arab Emirates. Continue reading Best Destinations You Can Reach from Heathrow

If The Wine Is Drink Of The Gods, La Cité Du Vin Should Be Their Temple

If The Wine Is Drink Of The Gods, La Cité Du Vin Should Be Their Temple

The tradition of making wine is as old as human civilization itself. History of European wine dates back to the ancient Greeks, about 8-6 century BC when people started cultivation and use of olives and vines. Wine was considered as main drink of the elite and in Roman times began to be accessible to nearly everyone. Today the process of making wine has grown into a major industry in some countries, even the main driver of the economy. Continue reading If The Wine Is Drink Of The Gods, La Cité Du Vin Should Be Their Temple

Bangkok’s disappearing street food

Bangkok's disappearing street food

For decades, Soi 38, Bangkok’s famed foodie haunt on Sukhumvit Road, was a carnival of colours, smells and sounds. Nearly every night, woks sizzled and the narrow road overflowed with roving eaters lining their stomachs for long nights out. Under bright yellow lamps, street vendors served stewed pork knuckle, oily chicken rice and plate after plate of piquant pad thai.

But when the owner of this land passed away in 2014, his family sold it to a property development firm and construction of a luxury condominium got underway. Continue reading Bangkok’s disappearing street food

The First Family of US mountaineering

The First Family of US mountaineering

If there were such a thing as a First Family of American mountaineering, it would be the Whittakers.

Mount Rainier – est 1899

Washington

The First Family of US mountaineering

The Whittakers, mountaineers

Read more about BBC Travel’s celebration of the US National Park Service’s 100th Anniversary.

Twins Lou and Jim Whittaker first climbed Washington state’s highest peak, Mount Rainier, in 1945, at age 16, and began participating in mountain rescues and guiding climbers a few years later. Continue reading The First Family of US mountaineering

Hawaii’s mysterious water bears

Hawaii’s mysterious water bears

Perhaps you’ve heard of the mysterious, microscopic animals that can survive being crushed, frozen, boiled and subjected to the vacuum of outer space.

Haleakalā – est 1916

Hawaii

Hawaii’s mysterious water bears

Sam Gon III, biologist and cultural advisor

Read more about BBC Travel’s celebration of the US National Park Service’s 100th Anniversary.

Tardigrades, better known as water bears, are tiny, nearly indestructible creatures with eight pudgy legs and snouts. Continue reading Hawaii’s mysterious water bears

The handmade paper that lasts 800 years

The handmade paper that lasts 800 years

The handmade paper that lasts 800 years

On the veranda of a home in Suoi Co, a rural Vietnamese village about 45km southwest of Hanoi, two women were squatting around a plastic bucket, dipping their fingers in murky water to select strings of fibrous white pulp. Behind them, tree bark was soaking in three metal water tanks – the first step in this long process – to separate out the fibre. They expertly assessed the mushy pulp’s consistency, making sure it was ready to be pressed into giấy Dó (Dó paper), a handmade, chemical-free paper that can last up to a staggering 800 years. Continue reading The handmade paper that lasts 800 years